When it comes to good evaluation, I always ask for college homework help in a reliable service. Usually these are written services that are recommended by my friends or acquaintances. When it comes to journalism, it's better to trust professionals, what would your future column look like in the best way.
Category archive

Old Lost Sea

Old Lost Sea is a natural history of Newfoundland & Labrador.

From reefs to riches

in Old Lost Sea by

A lone star from western Newfoundland provides an early chapter in the success story of starfish.

Keep Reading

Muscling in on a new world

in Old Lost Sea by

A tale of crazy weather, a union town, and a demon from the depths that might just be the first animal

Keep Reading

A pillar of time and fire

in Old Lost Sea by

Even when gazing at a Welsh hillside monument, it seems you can always find a connection to Newfoundland.

Keep Reading

Hunting ancient animals in downtown St. John’s

in Old Lost Sea by

Newfoundland was home to some of the earliest forms of animal life – and evidence of their presence can still be found all around us

Keep Reading

Shales with beef

in Old Lost Sea by

Newfoundland isn’t the only place to find…Newfoundland

Keep Reading

Newfoundland for shale?

in Old Lost Sea by

Fracking? It’s a complicated issue, but one we need to try to understand.

Keep Reading

Sealing my fate

in Old Lost Sea by

I used to think I knew where I stood on the seal hunt. Now I’m not so sure.

Keep Reading

On a Moroccan Roll

in Old Lost Sea by

How could a discovery beneath the seafloor of Atlantic Canada enable prospectors to locate oil in North Africa? It’s all thanks to our old friend, plate tectonics…

Keep Reading

Where the grand Banks met the farmer’s son

in Old Lost Sea by

In October 1766 in St. John’s, a chance encounter took place that would eventually change the world

Keep Reading

Northern Lights deep within the Earth

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

The provincial mineral of Newfoundland and Labrador is ancient, tough and beautiful

Keep Reading

Fortune favours the brave

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

Fortune is worth visiting for many reasons. Not least of which is that this is where animal life officially began on Earth

Keep Reading

Where an epoch lies

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

Gallipoli is perhaps the most infamous battle of the First World War. It is also the first place the Newfoundland Regiment saw action in that war. Why then was it such a key location, and why were the Newfoundlanders there?

Keep Reading

Trouble on the high seas

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

Newfoundland’s connection to the eastern Mediterranean might not be immediately obvious, but it has actually played an important role in a century of political, geographical and geological conflicts there.

Keep Reading

Green bay hackers

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

For thousands of years, the Baie Verte Peninsula has proven very rich in mineral pickings. Such a concentration of strange and valuable commodities in a small area invites the inevitable question: why?

Keep Reading

No mink left to sea

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

The remarkable story of a now-extinct resident of the island

Keep Reading

A pitcher worth a thousand words

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

With contrary feeding habits and an ability to eke out a living on unforgiving terrain, the purple pitcher plant is surely a true Newfoundlander.

Keep Reading

Burrowing in the Rock

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

There’s plenty of reasons to love Newfoundland and Labrador. For Liam, it’s because the province is an ichnological paradise…

Keep Reading

Gros Morne’s Old Lost Sea

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

The extraordinary, ancient, oceanic landscape that made Gros Morne National Park a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Keep Reading

A view to a krill

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

How curiosity about krill led to a fabulous tale about the blue whales off Newfoundland

Keep Reading

Rolling in the deep

in Featured/Old Lost Sea by

Though it caused terrible tragedy and destruction, the Grand Banks earthquake of 1929 revealed some extraordinary secrets of the sea.

Keep Reading

Go to Top