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indigenous

From Manitoba to Newfoundland – why understanding the significance of the treaty relationship is so important

in Featured/Journalism by

When Loretta Ross was a young girl growing up in Manitoba, her school had a career day. The place was full of professionals from all sorts of fields. Yet there was only one Indigenous person. Ross was therefore drawn to him, and it was he who put the idea in her head that was to shape her future. “He said [Indigenous people] need lawyers. He talked a little bit about why we need lawyers—and I said that’s it! I’m going to do that. That’s what I want to be.” After the session, students returned to their classrooms, and their teacher asked them what careers they had decided they wanted to pursue. “I put up my hand, and she said: ‘What do you want to be?’ I said ‘I want to be a lawyer. I’m going to be a lawyer!’ And she squished her nose at me, and she said ‘Don’t…

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Where next in the fight over Muskrat Falls and rate mitigation?

in Opinion/To Each Their Own by

On Friday, a group of protesters gathered at the Public Utilities Building in St. John’s, as they have for the past few weeks, protesting current and anticipated power rate hikes as a result of the Muskrat Falls project. Earlier this week, meanwhile, a coalition of over two hundred prestigious academics and authors signed a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, calling for a halt to the Muskrat Falls project, in light of the risk of irrevocable damage it poses to the environment and culture of Indigenous-led communities in Labrador. On the Island: power rate hikes. On the Labrador: threats to health, safety, and culture. The thing that binds these two acts of protest is Muskrat Falls. It’s a scandal that has united the people of the province in scorn, derision and outrage against a bad deal signed and supported by successive provincial governments, which threatens the very future of the…

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We are not political tools

in Uncategorized by

Politicians need to stop tokenizing and exploiting racialized and Indigenous people for political gain.

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No school for old (genocidal) men

in Uncategorized by

There can be no reconciliation without truth. And the truth is, John A. MacDonald’s legacy is tainted with Indigenous blood and tears.

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Colonialism in the justice system: Who’s to blame?

in To Each Their Own by

When it comes to Inuk land protector Beatrice Hunter’s shameful treatment, everyone is trying to pass the buck — including those who bear ultimate responsibility.

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Muskrat Falls: A deadly boondoggle that will harm generations of Indigenous people

in To Each Their Own by

As the megaproject inches closer to reality, opposition to its deadly impact is growing.

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Fear, anger, desperation, plans dominate Muskrat Falls rally

in Journalism by

Gathered in Happy Valley-Goose Bay Friday, residents of communities around Lake Melville cited methylmercury, the North Spur and colonization as main concerns around Muskrat Falls. Many want the project shut down, and some are planning direct action on Monday.

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Muskrat Falls: Yes, there is a way out

in To Each Their Own by

We can and must cancel Muskrat Falls. It’s really our only hope.

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Inaugural Mi’kmaq event set for this weekend in Bay of Islands

in Journalism by

The Elmastukwek Mawio’mi is a grassroots effort to revive an old Mi’kmaq tradition that involves people coming together and sharing in stories, music, food and ceremony, say organizers.

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We have the answers

in To Each Their Own by

It was published almost 40 years ago, but the People’s Commission on Unemployment report reads as if it were written today.

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The Labrador Problem

in Uncategorized by

The recent provincial budget highlights structural issues with how services in Labrador are financed. Rather than assigning blame to various governments it is necessary that the provincial and federal governments re-evaluate how services are provided to isolated ‘territories’ lacking self-governance.

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Liberals’ austerity budget will hit most vulnerable hardest

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Despite reassurances by government that all Newfoundlanders and Labradorians will share the burden of addressing the province’s $1.83 billion deficit, critics say the Liberals’ first round of austerity is disproportionately targeting the marginalized and least privileged first.

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Minister’s “illegal” caribou hunt argument is colonialist

in Letters by

“For goodness sakes, let us understand that a way of life, a culture, a dependency of the Indigenous population on this land and surrounding areas is slyly being wiped away for the sake of political wants and to satisfy a disconnected population with no interest or ties to traditional practices in any meaningful way.”

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Toward reconciliation in Newfoundland and Labrador

in Journalism by

Amelia Reimer, one of the province’s most vocal advocates for Indigenous rights, fields questions about missing and murdered Indigenous women, residential schools, and the path toward reconciliation in N.L.

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Skating club backs away from offensive costumes

in Journalism by

Following concerns from members of the Mi’kmaq community, the Stephenville Figure Skating Club says it will not outfit its young skaters in costumes depicting Indigenous people and members of other marginalized groups. But the club has not acknowledge any problems with images shared in its Facebook group.

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“It’s opening up knowledge about our past”: Mi’kmaw Chief

in Journalism by

Stephen Augustine, a Hereditary Chief on the Mi’kmaq Grand Council, says a new free online course he is teaching from Cape Breton University about Mi’kmaq history and culture presents an important opportunity for those exploring their Mi’kmaq heritage and identity.

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Racism alive and well in St. John’s

in Letters by

“I’m going on my third year living in St. John’s, and I’ve never been so hesitant to let people I meet know where and who I come from.”

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In praise of landlords

in Featured/To Each Their Own by

After all, they let us get away with a lot

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Picking up speed

in Featured/Remote Control by

The spread of technology means Northern life is no longer so remote. But technology can be a double-edged sword…

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Aboriginal Treatise

in Featured/View From The Mainland by

National Aboriginal Day should be a day to celebrate all of our history together as Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians – to reflect on how we have come to be on Aboriginal Land and on the status of our relationship

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