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inequality

Communication is complicated

in Columns/Opinion/The Nonagenarian’s Notebook by

“But far more numerous was the herd of such Who think too little, and who talk too much.” –John Dryden. During the early 1960s, I was assistant editor of The Newfoundland Examiner, a weekly tabloid published in St. John’s. It was a journal launched to provide progressive news and views that were not likely to be found in the province’s conservative media. Our sole reporter was Malcolm (“Mac”) Maclaren, who had earlier emigrated to Newfoundland from England. He and I were boarders in a lodge owned by Mrs. Penny (not her real name), and she became a good friend as well as a good host. One evening, however, her friendship with Mac was sorely tested. She had a dentist’s appointment at 8 o’clock the next morning, but her alarm clock was broken, so she was worried about getting there on time. “Oh, that’s all right, Mrs. Penny,” Mac assured her.…

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The myth of Canadian progress

in Letters/Opinion by

In the current squabble over improving drug coverage and child care in this country, it’s crucial that the social programs provided in Canada be compared with the far superior benefits that are provided citizens of most European countries. Apart from the United States, Canada is the only advanced nation that confines its public health care to the services of physicians and hospitals. In Europe, coverage is universal and comprehensive, incorporating dental and vision care as well as pharmaceuticals. The latest OECD report on the social spending of its 34 member states ranks Canada 24th for its relatively low 17.2 percent of GDP expended on social programs. Most of the countries that surpass Canada have social spending rates higher than 24 percent of GDP, and several, including France, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Ireland, and the three Scandinavian countries, have rates that exceed 28 percent. Incredibly, even the United States ranks above Canada…

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Measuring progress toward a better future

in Featured by

It’s time to look ahead toward the next provincial budget.

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Intersectional feminism does not uphold capitalism

in Uncategorized by

MUN Provost Dr. Noreen Golfman is waving the feminist flag while perpetuating class oppression.

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Budget 2017 poised to increase inequality in N.L., critics say

in Journalism by

Are the Liberals trying to balance the books at the expense of the province’s most vulnerable?

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World’s super-rich are wrecking the planet

in The Nonagenarian’s Notebook by

But they plan to survive civilization’s collapse.

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Navigating sexism within a class divide

in Uncategorized by

Cathy Bennett recently came out about the unfair sexist harassment she received, but it’s a more tangled mess than it seems.

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Oil talk must include more discussion of privilege

in Uncategorized by

A recent panel discussion at Petrocultures 2016 needed to admit the harsh truth: The shift to a ‘green economy’ will be uncomfortable.

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Deficit crisis a chance for change

in Uncategorized by

The province’s poor fiscal standing presents us with a real opportunity to discuss and debate some important policy issues, such as fair taxation, a new health accord, a guaranteed national income, and more.

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Inequality, neoliberalism, and the unmaking of the middle class

in Uncategorized by

Nowadays middle class values largely conform to the neoliberal ideology that has dominated economic discourse for the past 35 years. In light of our current “fiscal” problems, however, maybe it’s time to evaluate whether this has been in our best interests.

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Why you need to know about the TPP

in Uncategorized by

Prominent thinkers are speaking out against it and pro-democracy groups are calling for proper public consultations. But is our government listening?

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Christmas at Choices for Youth

in Letters by

“Thirty percent of the homeless population in St. John’s are between the ages 16-24. For them, and for many others, the holidays are not a happy time — they’re a reminder of being in a position of extreme vulnerability.”

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Report calls for action to end youth homelessness in NL

in Journalism by

With youth homelessness rates higher than the national average and growing, advocates say Newfoundland and Labrador urgently needs a binding and actionable provincial plan to eliminate the problem.

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Let’s raise taxes on the rich (Pt. 2)

in A Measured Opinion by

Economists from Memorial University have some ideas for changing the tax system in order to fight poverty.

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Let’s raise taxes on the rich

in A Measured Opinion by

Years of unaffordable tax breaks for rich people have contributed to a yawning budget deficit. It’s time to reverse course.

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Karl’s adventures in Newfoundland: Time for a healthy debate?

in Gadfly by

Newfoundlanders were scandalized by Karl Ove Knausgaard’s observations on hefty waistlines. Can we take anything useful from the hoo-ha?

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Talking Turkeys

in Uncategorized by

Food banks were supposed to be a temporary measure, not an institution. Could our energies be better spent tackling income inequality, rather than institutionalizing charity?

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Living in the Tory bubble

in Uncategorized by

It’s time to put an end to conservative ideology in Canadian politics, which has been stoking the fires and serving the rich

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Minimum wage town hall spawns stories of poverty

in Journalism by

Newfoundland and Labrador may be a so-called ‘have’ province, but despite the record corporate profits from our natural resource industries, thousands of minimum wage workers are living on or below the poverty line

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The trouble with charity

in Gadfly by

Giving and generosity may reduce the burden of immediate suffering and desperation, but if we’re serious about finding long term solutions we can begin by questioning why some have so much while others have so little

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