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Newfoundland and Labrador

FANE: It’s time to talk about ecology in Newfoundland and Labrador

in Opinion by

It might seem like a bizarre moment to be fighting to bring ecology to the fore in decision-making in Newfoundland and Labrador. But our decisions about how to proceed in the future depend largely on how we understand our past. Do we trust our politicians? Do we trust Nalcor CEO Stan Marshall and the appointed “expert panel” evaluating the North Spur? Have we been listening and attentive to how the Muskrat Falls project will forever change the lives of the Innu and Inuit in Labrador? One not need look far into the past to see that ecological issues have in fact been included in the scope of considerations about the economic future of the province. For example, in 2010, the province’s Premier, Minister of Natural Resources, and Nalcor CEO Ed Martin all promised they would produce “clean energy” and “environmentally friendly” power. Yet in times of strife, the province’s political leaders,…

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How to win over a gullible crowd: Stan Marshall and Muskrat Falls

in Opinion by

Back in the days before most Newfoundlanders and Labradorians had college educations, televisions, or Internet, there were certain assumptions which were made by the elites who governed them. These included the following: 1) You can win over a gullible crowd by using the following: a lot of big words; a lot of numbers; photos of mechanical contraptions 2) If you show your audience that you’re trying to explain a complex idea to them in simple terms, they will love and adore you for it 3) If you convince people that you’re working hard at something, they’ll let you get on with whatever it is that you’re doing, even if they don’t understand it and even if it doesn’t really make sense 4) If you’re implicated in something unsavoury, the best way out of it is to shake your head, pretend that the sophisticated machinations of others are beyond your limited…

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Proportional Representation: Why aren’t we winning?

in Opinion by

If we want to ever get a proportional representation referendum in this province we’re going to have to rethink our strategies.

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A minimum wage worker speaks out

in Letters by

As a minimum wage worker, who like most of those I know working minimum wage jobs (both here in Newfoundland and Labrador and across the country), works part time to full time to support myself and those I care about, I know the value of every paycheque I get. I know the value of making even a few cents extra on minimum wage, and the potential benefit to myself and others that a true living wage could one day provide. When the news featured Tim Hortons franchises cutting benefits in Ontario to make a statement against having to give workers a fair wage I saw people who would sacrifice someone else’s long term future for their own short term gain. I saw people crying foul from their winter homes in Florida because they no longer get to profit off of a broken system. Evidently so does Tim Hortons’ parent company,…

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Measuring progress toward a better future

in Featured by

It’s time to look ahead toward the next provincial budget.

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Ball Government’s new vision buries N.L. residents in gobbledygook

in To Each Their Own by

But cutting through the spin doesn’t inspire any greater confidence.

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A Woman’s Almanac revived after two decade hiatus

in Journalism by

Thirty years after the first edition was published, and 20 years after the last, ‘A Woman’s Almanac’ is back to document the diversity of struggles and achievements by women in Newfoundland and Labrador.

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Planning by a thousand cuts

in The Green Space by

After too many years of arbitrary budget cuts, it’s time to put some serious thought into our wildlife agency.

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Why are the Liberals pushing something that will make our fiscal crisis worse?

in To Each Their Own by

There is more proof than ever about the failure of privatization. So why is government still talking about it?

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Not “Our” Crisis

in To Each Their Own by

An anti-austerity manifesto for N.L.

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Why the nationalism debate needs to stop being dominated by white men

in To Each Their Own by

A recent panel on Newfoundland nationalism at MUN reveals the stale nature of the debate.

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Whose job is it to call out workplace sexism and harassment?

in Uncategorized by

It should not be left up to the target of harassment to have to fight for their rights.

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N.L.’s fiscal crisis was not inevitable

in Power and Dissent by

Yet our politicians tell us we all must pay.

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Dwight Turn?: Neoliberalism, Newfoundland-style

in Uncategorized by

Can the province’s new Liberal government deliver a “stronger tomorrow”, or will incoming Premier Dwight Ball build on the dangerous legacy left by Danny Williams and the PCs?

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(Election) Time for real action on racism

in To Each Their Own by

With barely a week left to the provincial election, will the parties have the courage to integrate anti-racism into their platforms?

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Why are we still waiting for midwifery legislation?

in Uncategorized by

Despite years of promises, why are Newfoundlanders and Labradorians still among the last Canadians without it?

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Status of Women debate a historic first for N.L.

in To Each Their Own by

Last Monday’s debate revealed the province’s three leaders know a lot about the problems, but are less clear on the solutions.

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What happens next?

in To Each Their Own by

Here are two things Justin Trudeau’s Liberals ought to do right away. Plus, a warning for the provincial Liberals.

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The Royal St. John’s Regatta: A User’s Guide

in To Each Their Own by

What is the Regatta, anyway?

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Trans March in St. John’s “an important radical act”

in Journalism by

Province’s first-ever collectively organized Trans March takes over streets of downtown St. John’s a day ahead of the city’s annual Pride Parade.

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