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renewable energy

Why is Canada far behind other countries in switching from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources?

in Opinion/The Nonagenarian’s Notebook by

It is depressingly ironic that, while many other countries are steadily switching from fossil fuels to clean and renewable sources of energy, Canada’s federal and provincial governments squabble over building yet another pipeline to British Columbia—one that, with the existing Trans-Mountain pipeline, would nearly triple the delivery capacity from 300,000 barrels of oil a day to 890,000. And the planned new Kinder Morgan pipeline would carry the thickest and dirtiest oil of all: bitumen. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau blithely claims that this massive increase in the extraction of oil from the tar sands is not incompatible with saving the environment from global warming. He proudly points to his government’s carbon pricing policy as evidence of a commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. He projects emissions will fall by 90 megatonnes by 2022, conveniently not mentioning that this reduction, even if achieved, will still be inadequate. It will fall far below…

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The Maritime Link: Remember how we were going to use it?

in Featured/Opinion by

Muskrat Falls was once touted as the key to long-term economic and energy independence for the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. No longer would we be living under the shadow of the bad deal done at Churchill Falls, no longer would we need to burn oil at the aging Holyrood Thermal Generating Station, or face another DarkNL. We would have a transmission link to the mainland through Nova Scotia, giving us access to the energy-hungry eastern United States. Yet, last week the island of Newfoundland began importing mostly coal-fired power from Nova Scotia over the Maritime Link. The Maritime Link consists of two subsea cables that run 170 km across the Cabot Strait between Cape Ray and Point Aconi with the capacity to carry 500 MW of electricity. It was built by Emera to supply Nova Scotia with power from Muskrat Falls and provide NL with access to export markets.…

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Oil sands workers champion shift to renewable energy

in Journalism by

A Corner Brook man and a few of his co-workers from Alberta are leading a new national initiative to retrain tradespeople working in the hurting fossil fuel industry to help lead Canada’s transition to a low carbon economy.

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The signs of change

in Letters by

“The renewable energy revolution is occurring faster than anyone predicted.”

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Demanding economic, social and climate justice

in The Sustain Ability by

Following a weekend of nationwide protests, and as Canadian politicians host their counterparts from the rest of the Americas in Toronto this week, people are asking: What will it take for Canada and its provinces to decarbonize their economies and join the growing global movement toward clean, renewable energy.

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3 barriers to climate action in NL

in The Sustain Ability by

Premier Paul Davis is in Québec City today for a climate summit that will see provincial and territorial leaders discuss plans to address the climate crisis. “It will be interesting to see where [he] directs the public’s attention, and from where he diverts it,” write two MUN researchers.

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Renewable energy, brought to you by free beer!

in The Sustain Ability by

A tiny Danish Island in the North Sea brewed up energy independence based on wind, solar, and biofuels — and it cost less than 1km of Vancouver’s 2010 Olympics subway to do it. Now the island’s residents earn money whenever the wind blows or the sun shines.

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Pillars of sustainability

in Off The Grid in Newfoundland by

These days it seems there is little creativity in house construction, but with Nature and Culture as our pillars of sustainability it’s amazing what we can do with our hands

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Alternative energy means alternative living

in Featured/Off The Grid in Newfoundland by

On the importance of being grounded in a ‘Place’

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How to build a pop can solar heater

in Journalism by

Did the rolling blackouts of #DarkNL 2014 get you down (and cold)? The key to staying warm may be in your recycling bin.

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Tuning into Nature

in Off The Grid in Newfoundland by

The path to sustainable civilization begins with the realization of an ancient Truth: we are Nature.

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It’s more than just energy

in Off The Grid in Newfoundland by

Going off-the-grid brings with it the challenge of changing our lifestyle

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We use what we generate

in Off The Grid in Newfoundland by

Electric heating is old technology that’s bad for us and the environment. If we want to become energy secure, we must first appreciate there’s more to heat and energy than flicking a switch or plugging in

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West coast anti-fracking group renews call for province-wide ban

in Journalism by

Events in Stephenville, St. John’s and Moncton, N.B. this weekend renew call for permanent ban on fracking and shift of focus to clean, renewable energy

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Time to start thinking differently

in Letters by

“When we don’t tie ourselves to the bigger-is-better mindset and instead be the innovative beasts we are, a world of possibility opens up. The magic is that this is already happening.”

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Damned if you do, dammed if you don’t

in Journalism by

A Port Hope Simpson man says he had “no choice” but to break the law in taking a principled stand against the Muskrat Falls megaproject. A master woodcarver and hero to some, he’s now left to measure the cost of doing business with injustice. Fortunately for him, he has some help.

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Climate change your attitude

in Featured/View From The Mainland by

Newfoundland and Labrador is learning the hard way: climate change can no longer be ignored.

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