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Notes from the Rafters: 13 April 2020

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They have added video. Each councillor now comes to the meeting framed by a hastily curated slice of their natural environment.

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Mormon Missionaries Find St. John’s a Rock in the Storm

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Given the situation in America, the families of the young missionaries are more relieved than worried that they can’t get back to the United States.

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COMMENTARY: How and Why We Fish (Part 2)

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Our current food crisis compels us to ask: what would it take to feed the province with fresh, local cod instead of global markets?

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COMMENTARY: How and Why We Fish (Part 1)

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Blinded By The Numbers? Implementing the Modernized Fisheries Act Goes Beyond Acting On What Stock Science Tells Us.

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Notes From the Rafters: ReduxPlagueTimes (RPT)

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Let’s mentally splatter-paint our way through some kind of understanding of what is happening in our city’s bi-weekly teleconferences and see how we do!

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Crunching the Numbers on COVID-19

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Mathematical models are not crystal balls, but they can be useful tools for thinking about epidemics and for devising strategies to fight them.

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“Stay Away:” Northern Communities Brace for Covid-19

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Last Wednesday, after a meeting with heads of government, health officials, police, and even the local fire department, Joe Dicker sat down and wrote a letter asking people to stay out of his town. The AngajukKak (or mayor) of Nain asked that anyone planning on coming to town—which sits on the north coast of Labrador in Nunatsiavut—to please consider the nature of their visit. If it wasn’t absolutely necessary, he asked that they “stay away.” The next day, the Nunatsiavut government issued its own directive, asking that all non-essential travel to and between Labrador’s Inuit communities be cancelled.  “Pandemics have had catastrophic impacts in Nunatsiavut in the past, and all efforts must be taken to help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus to all Labrador Inuit communities,” the release said.  Nunatsiavut is under the same public health emergency as the rest of Newfoundland and Labrador, as officials scramble to…

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In a Pandemic, Local Journalism is More Valuable than Ever

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Journalism is fundamental to keeping our society and democratic way of life alive as it too faces unprecedented stresses from the pandemic.

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An Open Letter to Our Governments on COVID-19

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In all responses to COVID-19 we must prioritize those who are most physiologically and socially vulnerable to this virus and the social response to it.

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Before Muskrat: Twin Falls & Our New, Difficult Heritage

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The first (but forgotten) dam on Labrador’s Grand River can tell us a lot about our province’s past—and its future.

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Land Protectors Occupy Natural Resource Minister’s Office

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Though framed as anti-pipeline protests, Wet’suwet’en reveals deeper national conflicts—what Minister Carolyn Bennett called “150 years of broken promises.”

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Constabulary and Critics Continue Tense Coexistence

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As International Women’s Day approaches, it’s been nearly a year since Jenny Wright stepped down as Executive Director of the St. John’s Status of Women Council. In October, the Independent revealed RNC and provincial government involvement in the sequence of events leading to her departure. Since that time, there have been a range of responses from community organizations, Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, and state officials. Five months after the story emerged, and nearly a year after Wright stepped down, the Independent takes a look at what’s transpired in the wake of the revelations. The provincial government has maintained clear support for key figures involved in the overreach, including Royal Newfoundland Constabulary Chief Joe Boland and now-Deputy Minister for Status of Women Linda Ross. But many important relationships across the community remain strained. The St. John’s Status of Women Council, as well as the Provincial Action Network for the Status of Women…

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Deflated but Unbroken, Dwight Ball Finally Bounces

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With the premier out of the picture, it is harder to hide the hungry abyss at the heart of Newfoundland and Labrador politics.

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The Dwight Ball Exit Interview

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In his own words, Dwight Ball reflects on his resignation, achievements, and legacy as the 13th Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador.

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Reckoning With Colonial Violence in Canada

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Those who assembled on Saturday in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en are among thousands taking part in ongoing blockades and demonstrations across Canada.

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Walking St. John’s After the Blizzard of the Century

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The whole city glistened, alabaster white and silent except for the cheerful calls of people greeting each other as they snowshoed and skied around the neighbourhood, and the louder shouts of younger more daring citizens snowboarding down Holloway Street on what Drew Brown called “the island’s sickest ski jump.”1 For three days our neighbourhoods turned back into communities, people had time for each other and, well, a lot of people had a lot of fun. And then the cars were allowed back on the roads. Obviously, people had to get food and medical supplies and they had to get back to work. The nurses who did forty-hour shifts and the hotel workers who stayed on for days to look after people from out of town had to get home. Not every neighbourhood has a food store in walking distance and not everybody can walk even if theirs does. But that…

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Memorial University is Hosting a Maverick Political Panel

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When a problem comes along, must you whip it? Four outspoken Canadian politicians are questioning parliamentary party discipline at Memorial next week.

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Unmasking Donny Dooley: Newfoundland’s Most Wanted Troll

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For years, an anonymous Twitter account mocked accident victims, berated grieving parents, and terrorized women. Today the Independent removes his mask.

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A Glimpse Inside: A Day at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary

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Advocates say a replacement for Her Majesty’s Penitentiary—dating to 1859—will improve safety for both inmates & officers. But how much longer can it wait?

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