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Don’t Cross Newfoundland and Labrador’s Thick Blue Line

in Featured/Investigation/Journalism/Longread by

The circumstances surrounding Jenny Wright’s departure from her post as Executive Director of the St. John’s Status of Women Council (SJSWC) were mysterious from the outset. After five years at the helm of the feminist advocacy group, she abruptly announced her resignation on March 21, 2019. A month later on April 17, CBC published a story reporting on a leaked letter, signed by eight individuals, that was sent to Wright’s employer (the SJSWC Board of Directors) on November 9, 2018. It complained about “damaged relationships” and accused Wright of “creat[ing] a divide within the community sector.” The letter was signed by representatives of five local community groups, one private individual, Linda Ross on behalf of the Provincial Advisory Council on the Status of Women (PACSW), and Chief Joe Boland on behalf of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (RNC). The signatories demanded an in-camera meeting with Wright’s employer to discuss their concerns,…

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Berni Stapleton is Paving Her Own Path

in Arts & Culture/Featured/Interview/Longread by

Memorial University’s new writer-in-residence talks about inclusive theatre, the power of the province’s past, and her pathbreaking career in the arts.

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100 Debates for the Environment in Newfoundland & Labrador

in Featured/Longread by

What do NL candidates in the 2019 election think about the pressing environmental issues facing Canada? We asked eight questions. Here are their answers.

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No Match for Love: The Church & Suicide

in Featured/Longread by

The church has a bad track record dealing with mental illness, and those who have lost loved ones to suicide. I know because I saw it happen to my father.

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Creating Sacred Space in Labrador

in Featured/Longread by

Religion, she tells me, is about structure and the power to manipulate and control. Spirituality, she suggests, is about creating sacred space.

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Filling the Void: Churchill Square, Parking, & City Planning

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Churchill Square was once St. John’s most visionary urban development. Now its future hinges on its value as a parking lot. How did the city get here?

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‘Des Solitudes’ Asks Us to Step Outside Ourselves

in Featured/Interview/Longread by

“It’s very difficult for some people to recognize that we all have a master, and we all have a slave. It’s something you cannot really talk about.”

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Lela Evans: From Muskrat Falls Protests to MHA

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“I made a commitment to my people and I’m going to live and die with that commitment. I’m going to represent my people.”

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Dam Nation: Fortis in Belize, Part 2

in Analysis/Featured/Journalism/Longread by

Should we be surprised that the practices fine-tuned by marauding corporations in the developing world are finally coming home to roost?

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Fragments of the 1,111 Points of Light

in Featured/Longread/Satire by
Art by Gord Little.

We now present you a partial list of the many great initiatives that transformed rural Newfoundland and Labrador into the envy of the world.

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There are No Captains at the Wheel

in Editorial/Featured/Longread/Politics by
election 2019 nl

This election is a referendum on Newfoundland and Labrador’s political class, and the status quo is losing. All we’re missing is a way to vote “no.”

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The Patient’s Progress, Part 4

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I’m beginning to think the patient is better off living in his fantasy. After I hear about New Year’s 2018 on the St. John’s waterfront, I want to join him.

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The Patient’s Progress, Part 3

in Featured/Longread/Satire by
art by Gordon Little

It is October 2007. An emergency all-party government unleashes a political revolution in NL. But a sudden General Strike threatens to derail the province.

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The Patient’s Progress, Part 2

in Featured/Longread/Satire by
Art by Gord Little

All Townie MHAs receive rural reeducation as the Baymen seize power in Newfoundland & Labrador. Meanwhile, a meal of Chow Mein nearly destroys the province.

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The Patient’s Progress, Part 1

in Featured/Longread/Satire by
Art by Gordon Little.

Case study: Patient has moved from a depression over the loss of rural life to an hallucinatory state in which rural Newfoundland and Labrador is flourishing.

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The Red and Blue Doors Open the Same Room

in Analysis/Featured/Longread/Politics by

As promised in response to the budget/not-a-budget pre-election kick off, I thought it would be useful to take a deeper look at what the Liberals have accomplished in their four years in office. Halfway through the election campaign is as good a time as any. Everything old is new again. As both the Liberals and the Progressive Conservatives have now released their “costed” platforms, it’s probably a good idea to think back to where we were when the parties went through this exercise in 2015. Memories of Elections Past In the spring of 2015, Progressive Conservative premier Paul Davis brought down an austerity budget in response to the collapse in oil prices and the sudden realization that the good times of the previous decade had gone bust.  Budget ’15 projected staggering deficits and proposed a series of tax increases (including a controversial HST increase) and a public sector attrition plan…

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The Passion of Graydon Pelley

in Featured/Interview/Longread/Politics by
Art by Sarah Brown

The 2019 Newfoundland and Labrador general election is a very strange beast. The province finds itself in the throes of existential crisis at the same as it is mired in a full-blown political depression. Nominations have finally closed for all parties, but only the governing Liberals are running a full slate of 40 candidates. The Tories are a close second with 39, while the NDP trail a distant third with 14 candidates. There are nine people running unaffiliated. As far as provincial politics goes, you could be forgiven for feeling like things are starting to circle the drain. But then there is the other weird feature of the 2019 NL election: there is a new option on the ballot. In November 2018, former NL Progressive Conservative party president Graydon Pelley announced that he was resigning from the Tories to form a new entity called the NL Alliance. The Alliance is,…

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