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government of Canada

Why all the cool kids want a new electoral system

in Gadfly by

Electoral reform might not sound very sexy. But it matters. A lot. Don’t let the footdragging wear you down.

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How much do we really know about the Canadian intelligence community?

in Uncategorized by

The Trudeau government is set to review the activities of Canada’s spy agencies at a time when it appears Bill C-51 has empowered many of the more than 20 agencies and departments with surveilling powers to violate the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

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Whose side is our government on?

in Letters by

The federal government’s recent leniency with wealthy corporate interests hints at a disturbing trend in the way government does business.

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Failed negotiations on residential schools lawsuit “slap in the face”: survivor

in Letters by

Government’s failure to negotiate a settlement with residential school survivors from this province is discriminatory, says Labrador residential school survivor William Flowers.

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Cindy Gladue and the fight for a “fair justice system”

in Journalism by

On Thursday St. John’s will join nationwide demonstrations calling for justice in a recent Edmonton murder trial, and to strengthen the call for women’s rights and a national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women

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Bill C-51 “will infringe on our constitutional and civil rights”

in Journalism by

Dozens marched through the streets of St. John’s Saturday to protest Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Conservative government’s impending anti-terror legislation, Bill C-51

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Still no inquiry into missing, murdered Indigenous women year after Loretta Saunders’ death

in Journalism by

More Indigenous women have been murdered since Labrador Inuk Loretta Saunders was found dead alongside a highway in N.B. last February. But Canada still refuses to launch a national public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women, many say because acknowledging the roots of the problem would mean naming colonialism.

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Dollars and Nonsense

in Going Deeper by

Why income splitting is an unjust waste of money

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Why I am not afraid

in Going Deeper by

In the aftermath of last week’s events in Ottawa, fear remains unjustified, whether it’s fear of terrorism or of the politicians who would use fear to their advantage

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“Everything reminded me of her…I couldn’t heal”

in Journalism by

Loretta Saunders’ sister launches ‘homicide survivor’ blog in the wake of yet another murder of an Indigenous woman in Canada. Meanwhile, Conservatives announce what critics are calling an inadequate strategy to address violence against Indigenous women.

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Big Brother is watching — but why? And should we care?

in Journalism by

Revelations of federal government surveillance of protests and public lectures may hint at the Harper government’s sense of “vulnerability”, says MUN grad student

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The threat of CETA: trade, investment and workers’ rights

in Holding the Line by

The damage CETA will wreak on our economy and our democratic rights is unprecedented. But it can still be stopped.

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Constitutionalize our right to a clean environment: David Suzuki

in Journalism by

The renowned Canadian scientist and activist speaks with The Independent in advance of what could be his final national tour, which begins tonight in St. John’s

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Trade treaties bloom, sovereignty wilts

in Cutting through the spin on CETA by

The federal government is engaged in five major “free trade agreements” that threaten the degree of control Canadians have over their land, resources, freedom and future

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St. John’s bids farewell to Oxfam

in Journalism by

After four decades advocating for local and global social and environmental justice, Oxfam Canada has closed down its Atlantic regional office in St. John’s

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CETA will erode our traditional rights

in Cutting through the spin on CETA by

In the third of this 5-part series: Canadians’ wants and needs may change in the coming two decades, but the constraints under our new treaty with the European Union will not

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Loretta Saunders’ death latest in growing epidemic

in Journalism by

As the number of missing and murdered aboriginal women in Canada continues to rise at an alarming rate, people, human rights groups and politicians strengthen the call for a national public inquiry

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Media watchdog says CBC at risk of being turned into a ‘state broadcaster’

in Featured/Journalism by

With its back to the wall, will Canada’s public broadcaster stand up to a government that is tightening its grip on the network’s freedom? Or should ‘friends’ intervene?

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Building a healthier society, one needle at a time

in Journalism by

As the AIDS Committee of Newfoundland and Labrador announces a significant surge in the demand for clean needles by injection drug users for the second consecutive year, a local documentary opens a window to the humanism of drug addiction and harm reduction efforts in St. John’s.

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Much ado about being Mi’kmaq

in To Each Their Own by

As the Indian status of about 70,000 people hinges on the outcome of negotiations between the Qalipu Mi’kmaq First Nation Grand Chief and Government of Canada, those left out of the conversation should embrace the opportunity to discuss what it ‘means’ to be Mi’kmaq.

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