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Inuit - page 2

“Erasing our history”: Muskrat not a done deal for determined locals

in Journalism by

$11.4 billion later and counting, Labrador’s controversial hydroelectric dam has done irreversible damage, say three locals who traveled up the Grand River to Muskrat Falls Wednesday. But the reservoir isn’t flooded yet.

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Muskrat Falls: Yes, there is a way out

in To Each Their Own by

We can and must cancel Muskrat Falls. It’s really our only hope.

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“How much do we have to give up before we say that’s enough?”

in Letters by

“We can take a stand — in our presence, in our words, in our willingness to unite, in our willingness to understand why we are like we are and in the effort to decolonize and take our rightful place on and for our land.”

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“Don’t kill the river,” sings Labrador songwriter

in Journalism by

Jacinda Beals Band releases new song in an effort to save Muskrat Falls and the Grand River.

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Time to slay the Muskrat Monster

in Letters by

“I love the fact that folks are speaking out about our lost services and our financial state, but I do feel we cannot call ourselves a compassionate people if we are not willing to stand up against Muskrat Falls.”

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Why the new Nalcor CEO’s background matters

in Letters by

“The new CEO would be wise to encourage a strong Board of Directors, who are diversified, independent of partisanship, and skilled in visioning and implementation.”

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Liberals’ austerity budget will hit most vulnerable hardest

in Journalism by

Despite reassurances by government that all Newfoundlanders and Labradorians will share the burden of addressing the province’s $1.83 billion deficit, critics say the Liberals’ first round of austerity is disproportionately targeting the marginalized and least privileged first.

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Minister’s “illegal” caribou hunt argument is colonialist

in Letters by

“For goodness sakes, let us understand that a way of life, a culture, a dependency of the Indigenous population on this land and surrounding areas is slyly being wiped away for the sake of political wants and to satisfy a disconnected population with no interest or ties to traditional practices in any meaningful way.”

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Toward reconciliation in Newfoundland and Labrador

in Journalism by

Amelia Reimer, one of the province’s most vocal advocates for Indigenous rights, fields questions about missing and murdered Indigenous women, residential schools, and the path toward reconciliation in N.L.

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Skating club backs away from offensive costumes

in Journalism by

Following concerns from members of the Mi’kmaq community, the Stephenville Figure Skating Club says it will not outfit its young skaters in costumes depicting Indigenous people and members of other marginalized groups. But the club has not acknowledge any problems with images shared in its Facebook group.

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Who will #MakeMuskratRight?

in Journalism by

Nunatsiavut launches campaign in effort to prevent loss of traditional food supply and risk to Inuit health; NDP only party to back them.

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White people are funny

in Behind the Screens with Cinema Politica by

“Qallunaat! Why White People are Funny” reverses the usual relationship between white people and the Inuit.

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Lest We Forget Aboriginal Peoples’ sacrifices for Canada

in Uncategorized by

Oftentimes Remembrance Day ceremonies pass without mention of the Aboriginal Peoples who served a country that was undeniably disrespectful to them in return.

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Is a road to Labrador’s north coast feasible?

in Uncategorized by

Here’s what connecting Labrador’s northernmost communities to the rest of the Big Land would likely entail.

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Dorm Kids

in Uncategorized by

In this chapter of a larger work in progress, Bill Flowers recounts his experiences living at a residential school in North West River run by the International Grenfell Association, where at the age of 13 he stayed in a dormitory among strangers in what was effectively a foreign environment and a significant culture shock. His story could not be complete without discussing this experience, one that has had such a profound impact on his life.

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No reconciliation for N.L. residential school survivors, yet

in Journalism by

As mediation talks continue in a class action lawsuit against the Government of Canada for its failure to recognize and take responsibility for N.L. residential school survivors, observers say the recently released Truth and Reconciliation report offers people in this province and across Canada an opportunity to pursue a meaningful course of action to repair the relationship between settlers and Indigenous Peoples.

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Still no inquiry into missing, murdered Indigenous women year after Loretta Saunders’ death

in Journalism by

More Indigenous women have been murdered since Labrador Inuk Loretta Saunders was found dead alongside a highway in N.B. last February. But Canada still refuses to launch a national public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women, many say because acknowledging the roots of the problem would mean naming colonialism.

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“Everything reminded me of her…I couldn’t heal”

in Journalism by

Loretta Saunders’ sister launches ‘homicide survivor’ blog in the wake of yet another murder of an Indigenous woman in Canada. Meanwhile, Conservatives announce what critics are calling an inadequate strategy to address violence against Indigenous women.

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Searching for identity

in Unikkâk (Tell a Story) by

From the Franklin Expedition to our missing and murdered women, Indigenous voices are being overshadowed

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From polar bear country to city life

in Featured/Unikkâk (Tell a Story) by

The pride and realities from a region you probably don’t know enough about

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