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new brunswick

The signs of change

in Letters by

“The renewable energy revolution is occurring faster than anyone predicted.”

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Fracking moratoria could cause “domino effect” in North America, including NL

in Journalism by

Three major decisions this week to ban fracking in New York, New Brunswick and Quebec indicate what some say could be the beginning of the end for fracking in Canada and the United States

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Abortion access on the agenda

in To Each Their Own by

It’s about time government took proactive measures to fulfill its obligations around reproductive health

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Fracking review panel: independent of what, exactly?

in To Each Their Own by

Five men—some with ties to big oil—have been appointed by a government that is heavily dependent on the fossil fuel industry and previously denied the need for an external review

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Why should every vote count?

in Going Deeper by

On Sept. 13, a group of fewer than 700 people chose our premier. Last week, New Brunswickers chose theirs. The difference here is important, and the problems of each vote illustrate the importance of voting to democracy.

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Our Maritime cousins get it right on conservation

in The Green Space by

Meanwhile, our own public discussion remains either muted or desperate

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Corner Brook residents march in solidarity with Elsipogtog

in Featured/Turning the Tide by

What the violence in Elsipogtog and the show of support from coast to coast means for our community

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NS students attending MUN increases by 1,079%

in Daily Indygestion/Email Indygestion/Journalism by

Maclean’s magazine, in its annual national university rankings, takes a closer look at Memorial University’s success in attracting students from outside of Newfoundland and Labrador. Some of the statistics are surprising: the number of Nova Scotians attending Memorial increased by 1,079% between 1997 and 2009; the number of New Brunswickers grew 800%; out of Memorial’s 14,000 full-time undergraduates, 2,342 were “from away” in 2010; in 1997, only 137 students had that distinction. Maclean’s takes a look at why this massive growth is occurring. Check out their article via the link below. Source: Maclean’s

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C-NLOPB has “never seen as much public reaction”

in Daily Indygestion/Email Indygestion/Journalism by

The Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board said it has never seen as much public reaction as it has against the project that would see Corridor Resources Inc. drilling a deep-water exploratory oil well in the Old Harry area of the Gulf between western Newfoundland and the Magdalen Islands. The CBC reports in its article today that public protests have taken place in the four Atlantic provinces and Quebec in just the last few weeks, and that no less than fifty submissions highlighting concerns have been submitted. The C-NLOPB has asked highly respected lawyer and former New Brunswick politician to conduct an independent review, which will include public input and the production of a website – to be launched shortly. Source: CBC

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P.E.I. wants in on Muskrat Falls

in Daily Indygestion/Email Indygestion/Journalism by

The Lower Churchill development could become a truly Atlantic Canadian endeavor. The Guardian is reporting that Prince Edward Island Energy Minister Richard Brown says that he has asked for P.E.I. to participate in the construction to help lower the cost of a third cable from P.E.I. to New Brunswick. “If we could tap on to that I believe we could get a better price,” he said. P.E.I. should be able to benefit from the project and if the province can tap in to the electricity from Muskrat Falls, it would mean all of P.E.I.’s power would come from sources that don’t emit carbon, he said. Source: The Guardian

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