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Mulcair: “We all have to be prudent when we accept conventional wisdom”

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Federal NDP leader Tom Mulcair fielded questions from the press late Wednesday morning after his party’s first closed-door session at the Sheraton Hotel in St. John’s.

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Resolve to remember

in Featured/To Each Their Own by

It may be a new year, but the taint of last year’s scandals has not gone away…

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Theses on Occupy Wall Street (Part II)

in "In This Present Crisis"/Featured by

It’s not that democracy’s bad, but …

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Harper says provinces must enforce crime bill

in Daily Indygestion/Email Indygestion/Journalism by

In the face of growing resistance to the Conservative crime measures being pushed through Parliament by provinces who fear that they will incur the bulk of the costs themselves, Prime Minister Stephen Harper says that there are “constitutional responsibilities of all governments to enforce laws and protect people.” He continued: “In our judgment… they’re not terribly expensive. And this is a fundamental responsibility of government to make sure there’s a criminal justice system that does what it can to protect people.” Newfoundland and Labrador is one of the provinces which has opposed the new legislation. For further reading, check out the Global News article. Source: Global News

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Newfoundland criticizes federal crime bill

in Daily Indygestion/Email Indygestion/Journalism by

As reported by CTV, Newfoundland and Labrador’s Tory justice minister – echoing similar statements from his Ontario and Quebec counterparts – says the crime crackdown by the federal Conservative government is a potentially “costly gaffe that undermines democracy”. Felix Collins agreed with critics who say that the Conservative legislation will result in increased jail rates, and that locking up more people for longer is hardly the way to reduce crime. Collins said he has never seen a study that favours more jail time as a way to cut rates of reoffence and improve public safety. Collins also raised concerns at the province having to foot the court and jail costs of the Conservative law-and-order agenda. He said a committee representing Atlantic provinces is assessing the potential price tag. Source: CTV

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Representation by numbers means we don’t count

in Featured/To Each Their Own by

Conservative plan to undermine our federal representation is something we ought to be worried about

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An Illustrated History of [Non-Violent] Crime in Newfoundland

in Featured/To Each Their Own by

We’re not just coloured houses and puffins, you know…

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House of Commons back in session

in Daily Indygestion/Email Indygestion/Journalism/NL Election 2011 by

While most eyes in Newfoundland and Labrador will be focused on provincial politics, news from Ottawa this Fall will likely come fast and furious. After years of hoping and planning, the Conservatives are expected to act now on many of their initiatives that were derailed due to the politics of minority government. However, with a majority, hot topics the Fall are expected to include: the redistribution of seats in the House adding 30 more ridings; the passing of new crime and punishment measures; the elimination or diminishing of the Wheat Board and Long Gun Registry; the issues surrounding Canada’s need to reduce its deficit; and the future of the Senate. Many of these issues will be directly relevant to Federal/Provincial relations, so keep an eye out for how the House of Commons’ agenda will affect the races here back home.

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NDP – Liberal merger talk heats up

in Daily Indygestion/Journalism by

‘Musings’ from two former Liberal leaders about an NDP-Liberal union have helped spur growing calls to ‘unite the left’ with the intent of balancing Canada’s political landscape. The idea has attracted the backing of former Prime Ministers Jean Chrétien, who, according to a Quebec columnist, boasted on a return flight from Mr. Layton’s funeral that his plans for a Liberal-NDP merger would have stopped the Conservatives from taking power this year. Meanwhile, former Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff said on his Facebook page that Liberals and New Democrats all care about generosity, justice and hope, adding it was a pleasure to “imagine what the future of our country might look like if we put those values first.” However current Liberal leader Bob Rae and a majority of Liberal MPs shot down talk of a merger or a coalition as a waste of time, even as they acknowledged that they face a…

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Layton to get state funeral

in Daily Indygestion/Journalism by

NDP leader Jack Layton, who passed away yesterday morning after a battle with cancer, will be honoured with a state funeral on Saturday in Toronto. State funerals are only automatic in cases of current and former governors general, current and former prime ministers, and sitting members of cabinet; Prime Minister Stephen Harper thought it appropriate to offer a state funeral for Layton, an offer which Layton’s family accepted. The government protocol office is working with the NDP and Layton’s family on details. The last state funeral was on July 3, 2009, for former governor general Roméo LeBlanc. It was held in Memramcook, N.B. Source: CBC

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The Politics of Arctic Sovereignty

in Blog by

It’s time Canadians demand to know how long Stephen Harper plans to continue playing the Arctic sovereignty card without actually doing anything to ensure that sovereignty.

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Harper eliminating political subsidies

in Daily Indygestion/Journalism by

It appears that the elimination of subsidies for political parties will be a key plank of the new Conservative budget in June. The $2-a-vote annual subsidy was originally created by former Prime Minister Jean Chretien’s Liberal government in 2004 after new donor limits were placed on individuals and corporations – a move designed to steer Canada away from the American-style political financing. In the time since 2004 the Conservative party has proven to be far more efficient in raising its own funds than the other political parties, and does not depend on it like the Liberals, NDP, and Bloc have. The subsidy’s detractors say that public money should not be handed over to political parties, but have also been accused of taking advantage of a Conservative strength to severely injure all of the other parties in the House of Commons. After winning the 2008 election, Harper tried to eliminate the…

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Gone to the dogs

in Featured/Skewed by

Not as bad as you’d think

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Economic Action Plan pt. 2

in Featured/Journalism/Politics by Numbers by
Graph showing how the government divided up its $260 billion response to the crisis

All you need to know about the largest government program that they chose not to tell you about

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Indytoons | Harper’s Retirement Plans

in Featured/Multimedia by

The truth about the F-35 purchase revealed!

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Every HYNIE counts

in Skewed by

Rocking the vote by making it illegal

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The Leaders Debate: What did you think?

in Journalism by

What did YOU think?

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Our federal election: the fairy tale

in Featured/To Each Their Own by

Once upon a time there was a land called Avalon. One day, a dark shadow emerged from the fog…

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Economic Action Plan, pt. 1

in Featured/Journalism/Politics by Numbers by

What does the feel-good ad about taxes tell us?

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Coalition speculation heating up

in Daily Indygestion/Journalism by

In national news — with an election campaign likely to begin on Saturday and the Conservatives enjoying a healthy lead in the polls, talks inevitably surface once again about the possibility of the formation of a coalition government. This idea will emerge in full force near the last days of an election only if the combined support of the Liberals and NDP is greater than that of the Conservatives. Harper will use the idea as ammunition against other parties as he did successfully in 2008, despite the fact other countries like Germany, Australia, and the UK have them and are functioning. For their part, Jack Layton of the NDP is not skittish about publicly discussing a coalition, but Michael Ignatieff of the Liberals sidesteps the question, insisting he is intent on forming a Liberal government. However, it is hard to ignore his mantra in 2008 — ‘a coalition if necessary,…

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