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Wade Locke

On the edge of a fiscal cliff

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Low oil prices and poor fiscal judgement have pushed Newfoundland and Labrador into a recession. With the looming threat of credit rating downgrades that could cripple the economy, Finance Minister Cathy Bennett doesn’t have much room — or time — to make some tough decisions.

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Lower oil royalties expected to last a decade: Dept. of Finance

in A Measured Opinion by

Official government projections for provincial oil royalties look bleak. We must adjust to life after the boom.

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Let’s raise taxes on the rich (Pt. 2)

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Economists from Memorial University have some ideas for changing the tax system in order to fight poverty.

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Should we frack? (Emotions need not apply)

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Institutional discrimination at its best: The ‘old boys club’ reviews fracking

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MUN economist predicting the future

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Memorial University economist and the province’s go-to-guy for predictions and analysis, Dr. Wade Locke, is at it again. Locke says that in the next 10 years the province will be facing a significant labour shortage due to the lack of skilled workers, and that will drive wages up. That shortage, Locke says, will have a trickle down effect and will impact municipalities. Locke is speaking in advance of the Newfoundland and Labrador Employers’ Council annual conference, which is taking place next week. Source: VOCM

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Hebron to bring in $20 billion in royalties, taxes

in Daily Indygestion/Email Indygestion/Journalism by

Economist Wade Locke has completed a report on the economic impact of the Hebron project – and he has determined that it is crucial to the long-term fiscal health of the province. He has concluded that the project is expected to bring in $20 billion in royalties and taxes over its lifespan and is expected to account for 55.6 per cent of total offshore production during the period of 2016-2037. Variables like the price of oil and the value of the Canadian dollar could deflate expectations to $11 billion or balloon them to $34 billion depending on the worst and best case scenarios. Read the full story and more from Locke’s report at the Daily Business Buzz. Source: Daily Business Buzz

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Prosperity: an unlikely challenge

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Public panel examines Newfoundland and Labrador’s ‘prosperity’: is it coming, going, or slipping through our fingers?

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