When it comes to good evaluation, I always ask for college homework help in a reliable service. Usually these are written services that are recommended by my friends or acquaintances. When it comes to journalism, it's better to trust professionals, what would your future column look like in the best way.
Category archive

Journalism

Are There Bears on the Avalon Peninsula? An Investigation

in Featured/Journalism by

Changing climates and municipal regulations may have unpredictable effects on the island’s black bear—also known as ‘dump bear’—population.

Keep Reading

Return of the U-Pass: This Time Bringing Students On Board

in Featured/Journalism by

Whatever comes next in the Memorial University U-Pass conversation, it’s clear that students need to be involved in a meaningful way.

Keep Reading

SJIWFF Goes Virtual for their 31st Annual Festival

in Arts & Culture/Featured by

“By supporting one another, we all do better. I think that’s part of the magic of Newfoundland and Labrador’s arts scene.”

Keep Reading

On The Road Again: Rum Ragged Back on Tour After Covid-19

in Arts & Culture/Featured/Interview by

“We’ll be grateful to be back doing what we love. We hope that a good night of music will at least make everyone feel a little closer together.”

Keep Reading

Why St. John’s Struggles to Regulate Noisy Vehicles (and What Ward 2 Candidates Would Do)

in Featured/Interview/Journalism by

Back in the spring of 2009 there was a committee meeting. According to the meeting notes, members of the Police and Traffic Committee (including city councillors, city staff, and Sgt Paul Murphy from the RNC) met that day with John Dinn (then-MHA for Kilbride) “at his request” to “discuss the issue of motorcycle noise.” In notes for the meeting, Sgt Murphy acknowledges the noise problem from “after market exhaust systems for motorcycles and cars.” He then explains that the RNC cannot do much about it without a change to the Highway and Traffic Act [HTA] to include noise standards. So the committee recommended that Council address the province and “request changes to the Highway Traffic Act to deal with excessive noise levels caused by motorcycles with modified or non-OEM [original equipment manufacturers] muffler systems.”  MHA John Dinn explained to the committee that the House of Assembly would not be able…

Keep Reading

Budget 2020: Waiting for Moya Greene’s Renaissance

in Featured/Interview/Journalism by

Newfoundland and Labrador has finally delivered its long-awaited 2020 budget. The key takeaway: watch this space for Budget 2021.

Keep Reading

The Snelgrove Cycles: What was Done and What was Lost

in Featured/Journalism by

Each trial is its own contained drama, but it is also a link in the chain of our laws.

Keep Reading

Hundreds Rally for Oil and Gas at Confederation Building

in Featured/Journalism by

Hundreds of people urgently demanded “political support” for the offshore oil and gas industry. But Premier Andrew Furey did not offer anything specific.

Keep Reading

No Safe Bet: Why Newfoundland & Labrador is Canada’s Casino Holdout

in Featured/Journalism/Longread by

In 2010, when Colliers International was listing the Battery Hotel and Suites for $15 million, they dared buyers to imagine alternate usages for the property—even those that went against provincial policy. “Newfoundland is one of only two Canadian provinces that does not have a provincially approved casino,” Colliers said in a brochure. “If this highly interesting situation changes, the site is sufficiently large to accommodate a Class A casino and hotel.” “Our policy doesn’t permit casinos in the province,” then-finance minister Tom Marshall told reporters at the time. “There’s been no change in that policy.” When asked if he’d reconsider the policy if a casino application was submitted, he was unequivocal: “No.” By 2014, Marshall was premier and Charlene Johnson, then-finance minister, suggested to reporters that they might be willing to consider a good offer. Saying the government would review proposals stopped far short of saying they would be approved,…

Keep Reading

Community Groups Urge NL to Waive Income Support Clawbacks

in Journalism by

The letter calls for a one-time change to the provincial Income and Employment Support Act to waive all penalties associated with receiving the CERB.

Keep Reading

NL CERB Clawbacks Push People into Poverty: Advocates

in Featured/Journalism by

Newfoundland & Labrador will be clawing back income support from anyone who received CERB. Advocates fear this will increase poverty and homelessness.

Keep Reading

NL Liberals to Purge “Potentially Fraudulent” Registrations

in Journalism by

The Dr. Andrew Furey Campaign expressed “heightened concerns” around party voter list after having its complaints against John Abbott dismissed.

Keep Reading

On Corporate Ties, Andrew Furey has Nothing to Hide

in Featured/Investigation/Journalism/Longread by

Up to now, an important aspect of Andrew Furey’s recent professional life has received almost no mention at all: his corporate board directorships.

Keep Reading

In Newfoundland and Labrador, Black Lives Matter

in Featured/Journalism by

“We just started last week. I feel like this is the beginning of something.”

Keep Reading

Yarnbomber Aims to Lift Spirits in Outdoor Art Gallery

in Arts & Culture/Journalism by

Twillingate is in the midst of a yarnbombing that aims to lift spirits while encouraging safe physical distancing during the pandemic. Yarnbomber Nina Elliott has knit what she dubs “Newfoundland’s First Outdoor Art Gallery.” Elliott is the Rock Vandal, a Twillingate-transplant from Hamilton, Ontario, who uses yarn to create temporary street art. Her work oozes positivity, and during spring to early fall often adorns the clapboard structures around picturesque Notre Dame Bay. The Rock Vandal’s latest endeavour, which kicked off over the weekend, marks her biggest project yet. Her yarn bombs often show as stand-alone pieces. This time, she’s exhibiting her work at scale, featuring up to nine pieces that collectively conjure a common theme: uplifting spirits, while living under coronavirus. Partnering with the local recreation committee to raise awareness for the project, Elliott says the show is something she can do at a time when everyone’s usual lives remain…

Keep Reading

Family Physicians Frustrated with ‘Fee-for-Service’ Billing

in Journalism by

Fee-for-Service means longer wait-times, physical and mental stress for patients, and higher costs to the healthcare system—not ideal in a pandemic.

Keep Reading

COVID-19 Drives Increased Needs—and Help—for Homeless

in Journalism by

The money from the federal government will mean “we’re going to see our capacity extended beyond what we’ve ever seen in St. John’s.”

Keep Reading

Memorial Grad Students Evicted for Their Own Safety

in Journalism by

GSU consulted with public health officials who warned them the Feild Hall residence could not be kept safe.

Keep Reading

“Stay Away:” Northern Communities Brace for Covid-19

in Featured/Journalism by

Last Wednesday, after a meeting with heads of government, health officials, police, and even the local fire department, Joe Dicker sat down and wrote a letter asking people to stay out of his town. The AngajukKak (or mayor) of Nain asked that anyone planning on coming to town—which sits on the north coast of Labrador in Nunatsiavut—to please consider the nature of their visit. If it wasn’t absolutely necessary, he asked that they “stay away.” The next day, the Nunatsiavut government issued its own directive, asking that all non-essential travel to and between Labrador’s Inuit communities be cancelled.  “Pandemics have had catastrophic impacts in Nunatsiavut in the past, and all efforts must be taken to help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus to all Labrador Inuit communities,” the release said.  Nunatsiavut is under the same public health emergency as the rest of Newfoundland and Labrador, as officials scramble to…

Keep Reading

Land Protectors Occupy Natural Resource Minister’s Office

in Featured/Journalism by

Though framed as anti-pipeline protests, Wet’suwet’en reveals deeper national conflicts—what Minister Carolyn Bennett called “150 years of broken promises.”

Keep Reading

1 2 3 87
Go to Top