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Journalism

Don’t Cross Newfoundland and Labrador’s Thick Blue Line

in Featured/Investigation/Journalism/Longread by

The circumstances surrounding Jenny Wright’s departure from her post as Executive Director of the St. John’s Status of Women Council (SJSWC) were mysterious from the outset. After five years at the helm of the feminist advocacy group, she abruptly announced her resignation on March 21, 2019. A month later on April 17, CBC published a story reporting on a leaked letter, signed by eight individuals, that was sent to Wright’s employer (the SJSWC Board of Directors) on November 9, 2018. It complained about “damaged relationships” and accused Wright of “creat[ing] a divide within the community sector.” The letter was signed by representatives of five local community groups, one private individual, Linda Ross on behalf of the Provincial Advisory Council on the Status of Women (PACSW), and Chief Joe Boland on behalf of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (RNC). The signatories demanded an in-camera meeting with Wright’s employer to discuss their concerns,…

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Berni Stapleton is Paving Her Own Path

in Arts & Culture/Featured/Interview/Longread by

Memorial University’s new writer-in-residence talks about inclusive theatre, the power of the province’s past, and her pathbreaking career in the arts.

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Buy Local, Save Local: Making NL More Self-Sufficient

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Every year, money flows out of NL that could instead sustain local jobs and investment. Why not make our economy more interdependent by reducing imports?

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Filling the Void: Churchill Square, Parking, & City Planning

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Churchill Square was once St. John’s most visionary urban development. Now its future hinges on its value as a parking lot. How did the city get here?

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The Online Front: Kashmir Conflict Spills Onto Social Media

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“Social media is biased, not to the Left or the Right, but downward,” writes Jaron Lanier. “Negative emotions are being amplified more than positive ones.”

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“We Need Peace”: NL Kashmiris Await News of Loved Ones

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“It’s very important to emphasize that it seems like a political issue—and it is—but at its core, at its heart, what is resonating is humanitarianism.”

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The NL Expat Survey, Part 2: Growth Opportunities

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Last week, The Indy explored the reasons why young people are leaving Newfoundland and Labrador. Today, we’re exploring ideas that might bring them back.

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The Newfoundland and Labrador Expatriate Survey (Part 1)

in Analysis/Featured/Journalism by

As Newfoundland and Labrador struggles with demographic decline, its provincial government searches for answers from those who left the province behind.

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Cod and the Fishery: Down, but Not Out

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Compared to pre-moratorium times, today there are fewer fish, fishers, processors, vessels, and plants. But the value of our fishery remains high.

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New Hospital for Corner Brook Announced, Again

in Journalism by

The hospital’s projected opening in 2023 would come 16 years after it was announced for the first time as part of Danny Williams’ 2007 re-election campaign.

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The Future (of Fishing) is Female

in Featured/Journalism by

Women have been the backbone of the Newfoundland and Labrador fishery for centuries. Earning that recognition is reshaping the maritime world.

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Lela Evans: From Muskrat Falls Protests to MHA

in Featured/Journalism/Longread/Profile by

“I made a commitment to my people and I’m going to live and die with that commitment. I’m going to represent my people.”

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Rethinking the Debt in Newfoundland & Labrador

in Analysis/Featured/Journalism by

Is there a progressive answer to how Newfoundland & Labrador’s debt could be managed while avoiding crippling austerity?

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Canada Complicit in Genocide: MMIWG Report

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The findings and recommendations of the MMIWG Report may be dismissed, but its charge of genocide cannot be ignored.

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Dam Nation: Fortis in Belize, Part 2

in Analysis/Featured/Journalism/Longread by

Should we be surprised that the practices fine-tuned by marauding corporations in the developing world are finally coming home to roost?

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There are No Captains at the Wheel

in Editorial/Featured/Longread/Politics by
election 2019 nl

This election is a referendum on Newfoundland and Labrador’s political class, and the status quo is losing. All we’re missing is a way to vote “no.”

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#NLRising, 3 Years On

in Opinion/Politics by

The 2019 NL provincial election is just eight days away, and yesterday marks three years since the #NLRising rally on Confederation Hill, organized by the NL Federation of Labour. I was invited to sing a couple of songs, so I took the opportunity to write a new one, directly addressing the 2016 Liberal austerity budget. Out came ‘Go Away Dwight and Cathy’, which singled out cuts to education and library closures, cuts to healthcare, and the ‘deficit reduction levy’. The 2016 Liberal budget was an attack on the people of Newfoundland and Labrador, there is no doubt about that. But people spoke out. The rally worked, to some degree. The song? The downfall of writing political songs is that they are only usually relevant to a situation for a short period of time, however, they will always remain historically significant. ‘Go Away Dwight and Cathy’ never gets much airplay these…

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Oil is On the Way Out, but NL is Going All-In

in Climate Change/Featured/Opinion/Politics by
art by Katie Vautour

Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old Swede, has jolted the world awake by simply telling a hard truth: adults have stolen her generation’s future because we have not confronted the climate crisis. “I don’t want you to be hopeful,” she tells us, “I want you to panic. I want you to act as you would in a crisis. I want you to act as if the house is on fire, because it is.” Her words have inspired millions of children globally to demand real action from their political leaders. This message is an essential one for Newfoundland and Labrador’s upcoming election. Greta and her generation know all too well that to have any chance of a liveable climate for most of us, global temperature increases must be kept below two degrees of warming. To do this, emissions have to drop steeply, reaching zero—no emissions at all—by 2050. It would have been a…

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The Red and Blue Doors Open the Same Room

in Analysis/Featured/Longread/Politics by

As promised in response to the budget/not-a-budget pre-election kick off, I thought it would be useful to take a deeper look at what the Liberals have accomplished in their four years in office. Halfway through the election campaign is as good a time as any. Everything old is new again. As both the Liberals and the Progressive Conservatives have now released their “costed” platforms, it’s probably a good idea to think back to where we were when the parties went through this exercise in 2015. Memories of Elections Past In the spring of 2015, Progressive Conservative premier Paul Davis brought down an austerity budget in response to the collapse in oil prices and the sudden realization that the good times of the previous decade had gone bust.  Budget ’15 projected staggering deficits and proposed a series of tax increases (including a controversial HST increase) and a public sector attrition plan…

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