When it comes to good evaluation, I always ask for college homework help in a reliable service. Usually these are written services that are recommended by my friends or acquaintances. When it comes to journalism, it's better to trust professionals, what would your future column look like in the best way.
Tag archive

Muskrat Falls

For Labrador Land Protectors ‘fear is gone’

in Featured/Journalism by

Time is running out for the Labrador Land Protectors. As spring thaws the frozen ground, anxieties are escalating for those who live downstream from the widely-contested Muskrat Falls hydroelectric mega-project: without an independent review of the stability of the North Spur and with a final decision yet to be made made on the methylmercury mitigation recommendations put forward by the Independent Expert Advisory Committee, residents say that they are desperate for answers and solutions. Last Monday, over 100 people gathered in Ottawa to send a message to the federal government, who have provided billions in loan guarantees to make the project happen: We’re still here, and we need support. Members and allies of the Labrador Land Protectors marched from the Human Rights Monument to Parliament Hill, where they intended to leave coloured pictures of Labradorians who currently live in fear of flooding and being poisoned on the desks of all…

Keep Reading

The missing ingredient in the Muskrat Falls Inquiry

in Featured/Opinion by

The one thing that government apparently doesn’t want discussed at the Commission of Inquiry is why our democratic institutions allowed such an uncritical handling of the project. On Friday, April 6th, hearings took place at the Beothuck Building on Crosbie Place to establish who would have standing to appear at the Muskrat Falls Inquiry. A coalition of three volunteer based civil society groups (The Council of Canadians, Democracy Alert and the Social Justice Cooperative) were among the twenty-two requests for standing. I ended up as the spokesperson. What does Muskrat Falls have to do with three groups that have no expertise in finance or engineering? What could we possibly hope to contribute? Look carefully at the Terms of Reference for the Inquiry and you’ll see that they largely confine participation to what the Commissioner, Judge Richard Leblanc, referred to at the hearing as “the business case” of Muskrat Falls. What’s…

Keep Reading

It’s time for serious talk about the NL fiscal bail-out

in Featured/Opinion by

The news is full of prognostications of doom and gloom these days. Province set to go bankrupt, unassailable debt, unpayable power bills. What are we to do? For one, we need to start talking seriously about what a bail-out of this province’s crippled finances would look like, if it happens. More and more people (such as the economist cited in this CBC story) think it’s likely to happen. A country like Canada, which espouses to first-world status, does not simply allow an entire province to go bankrupt and shut down. What we should be focusing serious public discussion about, is not if there will be a bailout, but what the terms and conditions of that bailout will be, and how it will happen. On whose terms, and with what end-goal in mind. We need to be having that discussion now, and it is deeply troubling the government has not made…

Keep Reading

The Maritime Link: Remember how we were going to use it?

in Featured/Opinion by

Muskrat Falls was once touted as the key to long-term economic and energy independence for the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. No longer would we be living under the shadow of the bad deal done at Churchill Falls, no longer would we need to burn oil at the aging Holyrood Thermal Generating Station, or face another DarkNL. We would have a transmission link to the mainland through Nova Scotia, giving us access to the energy-hungry eastern United States. Yet, last week the island of Newfoundland began importing mostly coal-fired power from Nova Scotia over the Maritime Link. The Maritime Link consists of two subsea cables that run 170 km across the Cabot Strait between Cape Ray and Point Aconi with the capacity to carry 500 MW of electricity. It was built by Emera to supply Nova Scotia with power from Muskrat Falls and provide NL with access to export markets.…

Keep Reading

‘What we can learn for the future’: David Vardy on the Muskrat Falls inquiry

in Featured/Journalism/Q&A by

The name David Vardy has been linked with criticism of the Muskrat Falls project since its earliest days, when he had already retired from public service. Vardy, a former Clerk of the Executive Council and Secretary to Cabinet and chairman of the Public Utilities Board, says the questions we really need to answer are about democracy and how we as a society are going to respond to Muskrat Falls. I sat down for an interview with him before he left for the Muskrat Falls symposium in Happy Valley-Goose Bay. Q: What makes you happy about what’s going on with the Muskrat Falls issue right now? Anything? So what makes me happy is that we finally have a public inquiry. And this is not the public inquiry that I asked for: what I wanted was a panel of people that were very knowledgeable about construction projects. And what do we end up…

Keep Reading

FANE: It’s time to talk about ecology in Newfoundland and Labrador

in Opinion by

It might seem like a bizarre moment to be fighting to bring ecology to the fore in decision-making in Newfoundland and Labrador. But our decisions about how to proceed in the future depend largely on how we understand our past. Do we trust our politicians? Do we trust Nalcor CEO Stan Marshall and the appointed “expert panel” evaluating the North Spur? Have we been listening and attentive to how the Muskrat Falls project will forever change the lives of the Innu and Inuit in Labrador? One not need look far into the past to see that ecological issues have in fact been included in the scope of considerations about the economic future of the province. For example, in 2010, the province’s Premier, Minister of Natural Resources, and Nalcor CEO Ed Martin all promised they would produce “clean energy” and “environmentally friendly” power. Yet in times of strife, the province’s political leaders,…

Keep Reading

How to win over a gullible crowd: Stan Marshall and Muskrat Falls

in Opinion by

Back in the days before most Newfoundlanders and Labradorians had college educations, televisions, or Internet, there were certain assumptions which were made by the elites who governed them. These included the following: 1) You can win over a gullible crowd by using the following: a lot of big words; a lot of numbers; photos of mechanical contraptions 2) If you show your audience that you’re trying to explain a complex idea to them in simple terms, they will love and adore you for it 3) If you convince people that you’re working hard at something, they’ll let you get on with whatever it is that you’re doing, even if they don’t understand it and even if it doesn’t really make sense 4) If you’re implicated in something unsavoury, the best way out of it is to shake your head, pretend that the sophisticated machinations of others are beyond your limited…

Keep Reading

“We feel powerless and terrible”: Inuit artist galvanized by Muskrat Falls

in Journalism by

Heather Campbell’s “Methylmercury” is now part of the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s contemporary Inuit art collection. The Rigolet-born artist is also selling prints to raise money for the Labrador Land Protectors.

Keep Reading

Make Muskrat Inquiry right, say critics

in Journalism by

An inquiry must include a forensic audit of Nalcor Energy, many argue.

Keep Reading

Muskrat Falls resistance growing across Canada

in Journalism by

Embattled hydro megaproject is a test of the federal government’s commitment to reconciliation and internationally recognized rights of Indigenous peoples, say organizers.

Keep Reading

Muskrat Falls Inquiry doomed before it starts?

in To Each Their Own by

An Inquiry is too important to be dragged into partisan bickering.

Keep Reading

“This is us against Nalcor”: Mud Lake leader

in Journalism by

Melissa Best explains why she got arrested outside the Muskrat Falls site Friday.

Keep Reading

Mud Lake community leader arrested at Muskrat Falls

in Journalism by

Melissa Best “goes to bed every night praying to God that she don’t wake up with her ankles in water,” says daughter.

Keep Reading

Injunctions, RCMP deployment “classic pacification”: Professor

in Journalism by

Nalcor’s use of court injunctions and the government’s approval of RCMP deployment to quell resistance to Muskrat Falls are common tactics used to remove Indigenous people from their lands and facilitate resource development, says Shiri Pasternak.

Keep Reading

Ball criticizes feds on food insecurity in northern communities

in Journalism by

Premier’s comments on food security in Canada’s north “totally hypocritical,” says jailed NunatuKavut Elder and land protector.

Keep Reading

NunatuKavut elder says he’s not eating in prison

in Journalism by

Elder and land protector Eldred Davis, 66, has been imprisoned since July 21.

Keep Reading

“We are not a bunch of criminals, we’re people trying to protect our land”

in Journalism by

Elders, land protectors speak out from Her Majesty’s Penitentiary.

Keep Reading

Silence is a weapon of control

in Letters by

“In this day and age, silence is being used to the advantage of those who wish to quell any resistance to ‘development’ by the people.”

Keep Reading

Elders jailed after refusing to stay away from Muskrat Falls

in Journalism by

“We don’t understand why we’re being treated like terrorists,” says land protector.

Keep Reading

The truth about Ed

in A Measured Opinion by

The former Nalcor CEO has a history of misleading the public on cost overruns at Muskrat Falls. It’s time for an investigation.

Keep Reading

1 2 3 10
Go to Top